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Last post Mon, Mar 17 2008 by Angelo Clematide, 12 replies.
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Posted on Tue, Feb 26 2008 07:10
by mpatkinson
Joined on Sun, Feb 03 2008, NYC, NY , Posts 3

Hey everyone- I'm new to the whole VSL thing, and I'm really amazed by the quality of the samples.  I was thinking a good way to get to know what the program can do would be to do a mockup of some of the great orchestra pieces already in the Demo Zone- would anyone mind pointing me towards some sources of MIDI files for pieces of such a magnitude?  Or if there is a better way to get the music in, I'd love to hear other ideas about the process.

With in-advance-gratitude for any advice for this "newbie," 

Mike (NYC)

Posted on Tue, Feb 26 2008 08:30
by hetoreyn
Joined on Sat, Nov 27 2004, Vancouver, British Columbia, Posts 1157
I think most people probably made their music on the demo zone be reading the sheet score music of a piece .. or playing it by ear. Not so sure there's any resource per se that you can draw upon. Although I maybe wrong, if so feel free to jump in guys.

.

Although VSL is very easy to use and it's very easy to start up a session and start playing high quality music with great instruments it's maybe not so easy to just simply grab a midi file and assign a bunch of VSL instruments and having it sound perfect.

.

One also has to be aware that you need to write in dynamics data (things like instruments going from soft to harsh, or vice versa), and articulation changes (From legato to staccato) to name but a few. Yes you can hear back instantly a serviceable rendition of said midi piece .. but if you want it to sound as good as it can you need to invest time into programming in the human factor.

.

So what I'm saying is that if you want to do a mock-up there is no fast easy way to do it and get the best out of VSL in that time. Like everything sometimes it takes time to get things perfect. The demos give you a good clue as to what you can do of course.


Hetoreyn
http://www.hetoreyn.com

Mac Pro 2013 - 3.5 ghz, 32 Gig RAM (Master)
27 inch iMac i5 2.7 Ghz 16 Gig RAM (Slave)


Pro-Tools 12 (Native), Mbox Pro 3
Logic ProX
Notion SLE

VI Pro, VE Pro, MIR, Vienna Suite, Omnisphere, Slate Digital Plugs.
Posted on Tue, Feb 26 2008 15:58
by Angelo Clematide
Joined on Thu, Sep 08 2005, Posts 1139
mpatkinson wrote:

[...]

would anyone mind pointing me towards some sources of MIDI files for pieces of such a magnitude?  

Sergei Prokofiev

Symphony No. 1 In D Major, Op. 25

"The Classical Symphony"

The first and so far definitive neo-classical composition.

Prokofjew_Symphony No. 1_1-Allegro.mid
http://www.sendspace.com/file/7mubrk

Prokofjew_Symphony No. 1_2-Larghetto.mid
http://www.sendspace.com/file/3sk4qt

Prokofjew_Symphony No. 1_4-Finale.mid
http://www.sendspace.com/file/5reg1r

We all are looking forward to hear what you do with Sergei's music.

Posted on Wed, Feb 27 2008 08:38
by mpatkinson
Joined on Sun, Feb 03 2008, NYC, NY , Posts 3

 Thanks for the really great advice and files!!!

I'm have a "classical" background, so I think it is a cool way to get to know things by digging into pieces that I know and love (and I love Prokofiev, esp. the 5th)

Cheers!
Mike

Posted on Wed, Feb 27 2008 08:40
by mpatkinson
Joined on Sun, Feb 03 2008, NYC, NY , Posts 3

 thanks for the advice- and when are the next Chattaway bits gonna be on the podcast?  I loved the first part! 

best,

Posted on Wed, Feb 27 2008 22:05
by PoppaJOL
Joined on Thu, Nov 17 2005, Las Vegas, Nevada USA, Posts 153
Any tone or group of tones can preceed, succeed or sound simultaneously with any other... inspired by V. Persichetti - 20th Century Harmony
Posted on Sat, Mar 15 2008 01:16
by Cutler
Joined on Tue, Oct 24 2006, Bath, England, Posts 52

Angelo Clematide wrote:
...

Sergei Prokofiev

Symphony No. 1 In D Major, Op. 25

"The Classical Symphony"

The first and so far definitive neo-classical composition.

 ...

Lovely choice.  But I have always had a little confusion as to why this is the "first" neo-classical work?  Why wouldn't Brahms count? He wrote many pieces that rejected the prevailing romantic movement and rather used the principles of Haydn's classical style, especially with the obbligato accompaniment (infected with Beethoven's natural and purely classical extensions to Haydn's style, a baroque feel for counterpoint, and a Schubertian feel for colour of key), and yet (just like Prokofiev, in his Classical Symphony) the resulting music has many elements that simply would have been anachronistic in that earlier age.  Brahms also rejected many of the Romantic extensions to the Orchestra, and still preferred the natural horns over the keyed or valved.

Posted on Sun, Mar 16 2008 01:01
by Angelo Clematide
Joined on Thu, Sep 08 2005, Posts 1139

Alexander Cutler wrote:

Angelo Clematide wrote:
...


Sergei Prokofiev

Symphony No. 1 In D Major, Op. 25

"The Classical Symphony"

The first and so far definitive neo-classical composition.


 ...


Lovely choice.  But I have always had a little confusion as to why this is the "first" neo-classical work?  Why wouldn't Brahms count? He wrote many pieces that rejected the prevailing romantic movement and rather used the principles of Haydn's classical style, especially with the obbligato accompaniment (infected with Beethoven's natural and purely classical extensions to Haydn's style, a baroque feel for counterpoint, and a Schubertian feel for colour of key), and yet (just like Prokofiev, in his Classical Symphony) the resulting music has many elements that simply would have been anachronistic in that earlier age.  Brahms also rejected many of the Romantic extensions to the Orchestra, and still preferred the natural horns over the keyed or valved.



In the English language ‘Neoclassicism' is the term in use for architecture from the 18th and 19th century, which was basically said, a trend to deploy stylistic elements of ancient Greece and Rome in architecture and decorative art such as painting.


.
Posted on Sun, Mar 16 2008 01:02
by Angelo Clematide
Joined on Thu, Sep 08 2005, Posts 1139

However in German ‘Neoklasszimus' in French ‘Musique Néoclassique' and in Italian ‘Neoclassicismo' is a trend in music starting around 1918 with some postulates by Jean Cocteau, influenced by Eric Satie. Soon the group called ‘Les Six' consisting of composers like Arthus Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc, just to name the ones I know, composed works in the postulated manner and Musique Néoclassique was born.

Musique Néoclassique - Neoklasszimus - Neoclassicismo: Jean Cocteau postulated an art form detached from the individual, an objective art which leaves the recipient in clear awareness.

Posted on Sun, Mar 16 2008 01:30
by Angelo Clematide
Joined on Thu, Sep 08 2005, Posts 1139

Prokofiev's Symphony No. 1 is composed in an attempt to emulate Joseph Haydn's composing style.

Here the word classical refers to Klassik, the era. The word 'neo' is interpreted as creating a work with the elements of the past but enriched with some elements of the particular present.

.

Posted on Mon, Mar 17 2008 12:59
by Cutler
Joined on Tue, Oct 24 2006, Bath, England, Posts 52
Angelo Clematide wrote:

Prokofiev's Symphony No. 1 is composed in an attempt to emulate Joseph Haydn's composing style.

Here the word classical refers to Klassik, the era. The word 'neo' is interpreted as creating a work with the elements of the past but enriched with some elements of the particular present.

.

 

Thanks for huges amounts of useful info.  But the summary appears to be that by the definition above, Johannes Brahms would as much qualify as the creator of "neo-classical" pieces as Prokofiev?  After all his method rejected most techniques of his Romantic, Nationalist and Abstract peers, espoused the essentials of Haydn's classical style and forms, but at the same time utilised more modern harmonies and extensions of melodic development that were unique to Brahms.  

Posted on Mon, Mar 17 2008 16:52
by Angelo Clematide
Joined on Thu, Sep 08 2005, Posts 1139
Alexander Cutler wrote:
Angelo Clematide wrote:

Prokofiev's Symphony No. 1 is composed in an attempt to emulate Joseph Haydn's composing style.

Here the word classical refers to Klassik, the era. The word 'neo' is interpreted as creating a work with the elements of the past but enriched with some elements of the particular present.

.

 

Thanks for huges amounts of useful info.  But the summary appears to be that by the definition above, Johannes Brahms would as much qualify as the creator of "neo-classical" pieces as Prokofiev?  After all his method rejected most techniques of his Romantic, Nationalist and Abstract peers, espoused the essentials of Haydn's classical style and forms, but at the same time utilised more modern harmonies and extensions of melodic development that were unique to Brahms.  

It is traditional that Brahm's had his difficulties with the general opinion that he is the new Beethoven.

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