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Reference Speakers
Last post Thu, Jan 16 2020 by crusoe, 7 replies.
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Posted on Wed, Jan 08 2020 21:36
by jshamon
Joined on Mon, Jan 22 2018, Posts 34

Hi,

I have a general question about refrence speakers,

To create a good sound for editing, mixing, playing, do i need only 2 ref speakers? the reason i'm asking because when i talk to music shops they always pitch for some speakers that will do good with low and high frequencies, and in the same time they said it is hard to achieve both (low and high freq) when you use 2 speakers (again that depends on the speakers but i'm talking in general)

so is it better to buy 2 good quality ref speakers? or create 3.1 or 5.1 surround with my musical workstation/room?

the 3.1, and 5.1 really seperate the low and the high frequencies.

 

-John

Posted on Thu, Jan 09 2020 00:51
by mohsohsenshi
Joined on Thu, Mar 01 2018, Posts 37
Hi,

In most case of home studio, it's good enough to have 2 nearfield monitors in order to get a decent reference.
Most of us can't afford a well designed studio which doesn't have any acoustic issues.
Setting 5.1 surround system in a bad acoustic environment just mess up your mixing.
So it depends on your studio's condition, I'd say buying a pair of 7"(or larger) nearfield monitors with any great manufacturer will get the job done. 5" is also a solution if you have a tight budget.

Best,
moh
Posted on Mon, Jan 13 2020 13:40
by crusoe
Joined on Sat, Dec 26 2009, Posts 122

Hi John,

Aside from what was already said, include your room into the equation, too. If it's a small un-treated room, you will easily overwhelm it with 2 5'' monitors. Want more bass? Get a subwoofer, not more speakers. And treat your room, if it's not treated. The question of low frequencies is really orthogonal to the quantity of speakers.

Cheers,

Crusoe.

Posted on Tue, Jan 14 2020 22:55
by jshamon
Joined on Mon, Jan 22 2018, Posts 34

okay then what method do i use to meaure/evalute the sound in my room? what exactly i'm looking for to achieve? the sound doesn't redirects back and forth? is that all?

I keep hearing about treating the room, all I'm doing right now is raising the speakers higher up to my ears level directed to me.

the reason that i never bothered about room treatment is because the room is rectangular (14x11 - 9' ceiling)

and on one of the long sides, i have a bookshelf end to end and a desk also end to end, also half of that side is a window which discouraged me from thinking of any room treament, AND there is no other room.

-John

Posted on Wed, Jan 15 2020 17:02
by crusoe
Joined on Sat, Dec 26 2009, Posts 122

Hi John,

it's a pretty big subject. There's plenty of information on the the web, YouTube included. How did I personally know that my room needs treatment? I turned on some talk show, very well recorded audio, and yet half of all the words were munched, drowned in a wash of the room echo. It's as simple as that.

Cheers,

Crusoe.

Posted on Wed, Jan 15 2020 17:54
by jshamon
Joined on Mon, Jan 22 2018, Posts 34

Hi Crusoe,

I looked at YouTube etc, read about the topic.

i have done something similar to tune up my 5.1 in my TV media room, but that was all done through Denon receiver and only adjusting the sub woofer levels.

I think i need a software analyzer and a mic, do you recommand any vendor?

also, it looks like the best thing to do with what I have is to buy "Foam Acoustic Panels" that i can return and try out myself how to improve the sound with the (software + mic).

again, do you know of any kit? or any place to invest in?

Don't forget, i'm not doing this to make money, it is just a hobby and its been a great fun, this whole thing gave me a lot of knowledge of digital orchestration, as i play the piano - classical.

-John

Posted on Thu, Jan 16 2020 10:58
by crusoe
Joined on Sat, Dec 26 2009, Posts 122

Hi John,

3.1 is a very good option, I suppose. If you have enough space in your room, that is. You will hear plenty of bass with a subwoofer, but how helpful it will be in a small room (for mixing) is not a given. But there's no question, if you care about bass below 60Hz, you need a sub.

Foam, yes. Stuff from Universal Acoustics is reasonably priced and works well. It also doesn't smell when unpacked, which is nice. Pluto-1 is a good starter kit. Use it to diffuse direct reflections fro the speakers.

Bass traps - yes. Can't give the exact recommendation here. If you are adventurous, you could make them yourself following the advice here. Set them up in the corners, as many people suggest.

Acoustic measurements... maybe, but that's after the previous two points. You will get used to the new room, and after some time you will actually know what needs a correction (with some luck). Not precisely, of course, and that's where the measurements will come in handy. But the other way around... I'm not so sure. It's the same principle as with mixing in general - don't do something unless you know why you need to.

Cheers,

Crusoe.

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