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My first VSL composition
Last post Fri, Oct 03 2014 by GoranTch, 4 replies.
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Posted on Sat, Sep 20 2014 13:53
by lyncisAt
Joined on Mon, Aug 25 2014, Posts 7

Hello everybody,

I would like to share my first approach composing and orchestrating with VLS.

I started using virtual instruments and a daw earlier this year, so I'm not that experienced with virtual orchestration. This pice of music is my first attempt arranging and composing for a full size film music orchestra. So this particular cue is the main theme of a wild west themed soundtrack, so I was trying to get this huge film music sound out of it. 90% of the instruments are VSL Special Edition samples.

I'm pretty happy with the theme and the orchestration the way it is, but I also tried to do the mixing and mastering all by myself. So I used the MIRx reverb with natural volume and the humanize function of VI Pro to get a natural orchestra sound for writing the music. Since I don't know much about mixing and mastering, I used a lot of the factory presets for EQ, compressor & limiter to fatten up the sound and balance it. At the end I added reverb again on the complete master output, to get this huge and distant film music sound. I guess that was a little bit too much, because the single instruments merge with others. But I actually do like how the brass/woodwind sections as a whole play now against each other. So what do you think about this wild west theme?

v.1 (very long recording hall, long reverb):

Dropbox - Wild West Landsides v.1

v.2 (smaller recording stage, less reflection):

Dropbox - Wild West Landsides v.2

v.3 (close recording, small reverb tails):

Dropbox - Wild West Landsides v.3

I'm happy about every kind of comments, help & criticism, so feel free to let me know!

Andrew

Posted on Mon, Sep 22 2014 15:49
by GoranTch
Joined on Tue, Mar 14 2006, Berlin, Germany, Posts 524

Very good for a VSL novice ;-)

I prefer the second version, to me it sounds the least "flat" spatially (it has, among other advantages, a larger percieved distance of the brass from woods & strings). In general, the spatial setup would greatly benefit from optimized dry-to-wet stereo width relations and (here comes the usual suspect ;-) "stretching out" the Z-axis (more pronounced distance relations between different orchestra sections).

Posted on Wed, Oct 01 2014 21:58
by lyncisAt
Joined on Mon, Aug 25 2014, Posts 7

Thank you for you kind words and the suggestions! :) I'm not really sure though where to start to do so... Do you mean like adding more dry/wet ratio to the brass and less to the strings for example? Sorry - completly new to this mixing or mastering thing :)

Posted on Fri, Oct 03 2014 13:32
by GoranTch
Joined on Tue, Mar 14 2006, Berlin, Germany, Posts 524
lyncisAt wrote:

Thank you for you kind words and the suggestions! :) I'm not really sure though where to start to do so... Do you mean like adding more dry/wet ratio to the brass and less to the strings for example? Sorry - completly new to this mixing or mastering thing :)

No problem ;- )

I was referring to the stereo width relations between the dry and the wet componenets of the signal, not the dry/wet ratios in themselves (changing these can be helpful in achieving a less "flat" and more "3D" impression of the acoustic space though, but it usually won't solve everything).

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