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Pathos and Rapture Piano Quintet
Last post Sun, Feb 10 2019 by Acclarion, 16 replies.
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Posted on Sun, Jan 20 2019 21:17
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

I was missing the forum and rather than let my newest piece just go straight to the Soundcloud graveyard, I thought I'd share it with you.  It's in 2 movements, and yes, it's a 13 minute time commitment, but I hope you'll consider sitting through it, as I put a lot of love in this one, as did Becky with the mix.  Hope you like it!

Pathos and Rapture by David Carovillano (Mov't. 1)

Pathos and Rapture by David Carovillano (Mov't. 2)

All the best,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Mon, Jan 21 2019 13:34
by tchampe
Joined on Wed, Apr 25 2018, Posts 31

Dave and Becky,

Such exquisite, timeless music! I listened to it as I do all music: hoping to hear what the artists felt in creating it and what they were trying to say to me. Frankly, I usually can't tell. So much of what I hear seems like it was created to fill a particular need...evoke a certain sound, touch some specific emotion...whether the musician ever felt it or not. Oh, I can admire or even enjoy such stuff if it's well done, but it's not what I am hoping for when I click PLAY on a tune I've never heard before. Your music never disappoints.

Interestingly, in this work, all I could feel was the Rapture. I'm sure that's my weakness as a listener coming through; conditioned by a lifetime of minor tonality + slow tempo = sad. But if it was easy for me to sense the joy, wonder, and love that you put into this piece. You guys are rare talents, destined to have a voice that is not really of this time and place. I'm sorry that such a relatively small number of people will ever experience it but I'm happy that I am one of them.

Thanks and best wishes,

Tom

Posted on Mon, Jan 21 2019 15:44
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

Tom,

Your comments mean so much to me.  There is constant struggle and frustration when the music that I feel compelled to write simply doesn't resonate with our times.  I often grudgingly wish I could trade in my musical voice for something more appealing to the masses, but alas, writing music is such a personal thing, and to deny one's authentic voice in pursuit of greater accolades from an often fickle, "flavour of the month" audience, isn't worth it.  And so, we continue to do our own thing, hoping that on occasion, a person here or there will feel a connection to the music we create with heartfelt sincerity.  

Now that I've expressed my mushy/sentimental side, allow me to just say thank you. 

All the best,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Tue, Jan 22 2019 03:11
by William
Joined on Sun, Nov 24 2002, USA, Posts 5284

That sounds wonderful, I wanted to listen on my old style stereo system not a computer.  This needs to be on CD and - best of all - LP records.  Or maybe even a 78 rpm album.  It would take about 6 records to do that.  I have a lot of 78s.  They present Gilbert and Sullivan in the best possible way.  

I know what you are talking about with the "soundcloud graveyard."  So well put!  There is a computer music graveyard as well.  

My music is similarly not in fashion. 

And yet we here continue doing it. 

And the VSL Forum has given - very generously - a venue for these ...

Posted on Tue, Jan 22 2019 10:05
by crusoe
Joined on Sat, Dec 26 2009, Posts 99

Hi Dave,

In contrast to what Tom said, I mostly thought about pathos :) Could be that I'm particularly sensitive to it (naturally) in music. There's a lot of expression, both in music itself and in the execution (those slight, but quite assertive tempo changes). I liked how the piece progresses compositionally, and with two parts it felt like a complete piece (although I guess there's some freedom for expansion there).

A couple of questions, if you don't mind. When the "main" theme, initially played by the piano, is repeated with strings added, those chords' harmonic balance changes a little, I guess because the the violins attract so much attention. Specifically, at 0:57 of the 1st mvt. And those recurring high notes made the rest of the harmony somewhat hidden to my ear, while it was perfect with the solo piano. Is this something you could confirm, or it's just my perception? Could very well be the latter.

Last note about piano - are you happy with the way reverb works on it? It seems as though it's in a different space compared to the rest of the ensemble.

Cheers,

Crusoe.

Posted on Tue, Jan 22 2019 19:43
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

Hey Bill,

As always, thank you so much for listening.  It means a lot to me.  

As for putting it on physical media, I totally get where you're coming from, but until I can unload the boxes of unsold Acclarion CD's collecting dust in my basement, no new music shall ever be transferred to vinyl, CD, or 8-track :)

It's funny about how times have changed:  years ago, one's aim would be to sell their music; today, we need to be grateful just to get it heard for free (and then there are those that actually pay to get fake listens! God help them).

I'm happy for the small, but loyal group of VSL users that take the time to listen.

Talk soon,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Tue, Jan 22 2019 19:53
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

Hey Crusoe,

Thanks, as always for your critical listening and questions.  Glad you enjoyed the piece.

The choice to place the descending line (which alters the harmony) in the viola, while having the two violins in octaves above it playing forcefully, was purposely to bury the harmony the second time, after allowing the progression to be heard clearly in the piano.  I thought the upper strings were like tense elastic bands being pulled back, and wanted that intensity to be felt, while letting the harmonic changes happen subtly in the background.  You'll also note that the chords are reversed in terms of octave progressions (the piano plays low to high, while the strings play high to low).

As for the piano, well, we're both as happy with it as can be reasonably expected.  It was placed behind the strings in the centre of the U formation, but despite this, often it seems more forward than it reflects on the Mir stage.  Also, we narrowed the panning for the piano significantly, because it can quickly overwhelm everything and drown out the strings.  Then, we also knocked a little of the mid-range frequencies down, because again, the piano can build the overtones to muddying levels quickly, especially with lots of pedal use, which a piece like this demands.  So, the long and short of it is, I think the piano's pristine clarity almost creates a sonic separation between it and the strings in a way that makes you think they're in two different spaces.  I am still quite pleased with the overall blend, personally.

Cheers,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Wed, Jan 23 2019 10:48
by crusoe
Joined on Sat, Dec 26 2009, Posts 99

Hey Dave,

Thanks for the informative response, it actually expands my way of thinking about piano, specifically, how you tame the mids depending on pedal use (they are, indeed, a bit of a problem).

Cheers,

Crusoe.

Posted on Thu, Feb 07 2019 02:25
by Paul McGraw
Joined on Mon, Feb 29 2016, Georgia, USA, Posts 383

Hi Dave,

I enjoyed listening. Very dramatic, which I like. Wonderful harmonies. The first movement sounds very orchestral to my ears. I believe it would work very well for full orchestra. That first movement is full of tension and has a "romantic" character that brought Korngold to mind. And of course, that is a good thing. 

Personally, I would ditch the second movement, or use it with something else. The first movement stands on its own very well and to me seems complete in itself. But that is just me. Just a personal opinion.

Paul McGraw

Posted on Sat, Feb 09 2019 10:02
by jasensmith
Joined on Tue, Jan 15 2008, Arizona, Posts 1449

Hello Dave,

This is yet another fine piece that you have posted here and I thank you for sharing.

Like many of your other works you've posted for our enjoyment, the music just grabs you by the hand and drags you into this multiverse of expressions themes and ideas.  In short, it's a musical journey rather just a listening experience.. Put on your seatbelt and enjoy the ride because you are about to take a tour through a diverse range of sonic dimensions.  Each one of these dimensions are aesthetically pleasing in their own unique way.

Of course one listen isn't enough to fully absorbe the emotion and soul being displayed here but, at thirteen minutes Dave, I'll just have to take it in bit by bit.

As for the Soundcloud graveyard try not to be discouraged Dave.  Who knows, years from now somebody might find this on an old harddrive somewhere and discover you and your music kind of like Bach was discovered posthumously.

Of course, by then, we'll be playing our music on a harp with Saint Pete being our only audience.. But at least somebody's listening.

(sigh)        


"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no point in being a damn fool about it."
- W.C. Fields
Posted on Sat, Feb 09 2019 16:07
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

Thanks so much for listening and sharing your thoughts, Paul and Jasen.

Paul, it actually did start as a single movement.  I decided to add the second movement a few days later and create that whole "Pathos and Rapture" dichotomy.  Most people that commented on the piece here and elsewhere suggested they preferred the second movement, but of course, asking me to choose one over the other (or, remove a movement now that it's already written) would be like picking between children.  Our music is so personal and while I don't love all my pieces equally, I couldn't bring myself to toss part of a complete work.  The nice thing about multi-movement works is that they can be enjoyed complete, but as often happens with virtually all classical music, people have their favourite movements (to refer to your recent Dvorak, I like the 2nd movement, as with the Grieg Piano Concerto...whereas I've never gone past the opening movement of Haydn's Symphony 56).

Jasen, you have a way with words!  I really do like to tell stories through a piece, and create a natural flow through the various ideas...sometimes it's unified with a tight/formal structure, whereas often, I prefer the "through-composed" approach (obviously not referring to the artsong application of the term but borrowing it to explain the way I write instrumental music).  Anyway, I'm glad you gave it a listen, or just parts thereof.  If you sip on espressos, perhaps you'll get through the whole piece over the course of a week's worth of shots :) lol

Yeah, about the whole "discovered after you're dead" thing, I'm starting to coin a phrase to serve as my mission statement:  "Lay the groundwork now for the fame that will follow in 200 years." 

All the best,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Sat, Feb 09 2019 18:28
by William
Joined on Sun, Nov 24 2002, USA, Posts 5284

There used to be a record label called Nonesuch that had very picturesque and funny covers with psychedelic-influenced paintings  and featured all kinds of obscure music all the way from medieval to modernist.  One piece was by a totally unknown composer of the Renaissance for 8 sackbuts and continuo.  It was fantastic but I can't even remember the compsoer or piece, though I have it somewhere in my collection of 11,000 LPs, all of which are out of order. 

I am getting the feeling that I am like that composer - an odd curiosity of music who may be unearthed centuries from now by some quirky individuals looking for a vaguely interesting diversion.  Though with the coming Global Warming Zombie Apocalypse I and my musical productions will probably be merely a part of a calcified strata layer several hundred feet below the earth's surface.

Posted on Sat, Feb 09 2019 22:53
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

William, your post above is as great as any music ever featured on those 11,000 LPs (11,000?!?!?!?!)  The greatest fear I had starting to write music five years ago was, "will I be able to come up with anything good/original/worth sharing?"  Now, it's "will any of it be performed/enjoyed/remembered?"  We all need to feel like our work has meaning; unfortunately, in the isolated world of composition, one must find the meaning within.  As long as you look back and can be proud of your own work and effort, it really shouldn't matter whether or not others care...I know, easier said than done :)

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
Posted on Sun, Feb 10 2019 10:26
by jasensmith
Joined on Tue, Jan 15 2008, Arizona, Posts 1449

Originally Posted by: Acclarion Go to Quoted Post

Paul, it actually did start as a single movement.  I decided to add the second movement a few days later and create that whole "Pathos and Rapture" dichotomy.  Most people that commented on the piece here and elsewhere suggested they preferred the second movement, but of course, asking me to choose one over the other (or, remove a movement now that it's already written) would be like picking between children.  Our music is so personal and while I don't love all my pieces equally, I couldn't bring myself to toss part of a complete work.  The nice thing about multi-movement works is that they can be enjoyed complete, but as often happens with virtually all classical music, people have their favourite movements (to refer to your recent Dvorak, I like the 2nd movement, as with the Grieg Piano Concerto...whereas I've never gone past the opening movement of Haydn's Symphony 56).

Or you could add a third movement just to see what would happen although I don't recommend that kind of attitude when it comes to having children.

Actually Dave, I listened to both movements in their entirety while I was on a long drive and I favor the second movement as well (don't take this the wrong way Paul but I respectfully disagree).  The taking it in bit by bit has more to do with my "multiverse" comment.  In other words, the listener would need to listen several times to enjoy all of the layers the piece has to offer.  


"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no point in being a damn fool about it."
- W.C. Fields
Posted on Sun, Feb 10 2019 10:34
by jasensmith
Joined on Tue, Jan 15 2008, Arizona, Posts 1449

Originally Posted by: William Go to Quoted Post

Though with the coming Global Warming Zombie Apocalypse I and my musical productions will probably be merely a part of a calcified strata layer several hundred feet below the earth's surface.

Or they will be sampled by some 14 year old Hip Hopper/rap "artist" wannabe and used in his or her EDM track which will dominate the Pop charts for a few fleeting seconds.

 Obscurity is looking better and better


"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no point in being a damn fool about it."
- W.C. Fields
Posted on Sun, Feb 10 2019 17:49
by Acclarion
Joined on Sat, Aug 15 2015, Canada, Eh!, Posts 436

Originally Posted by: jasensmith Go to Quoted Post

Or you could add a third movement just to see what would happen although I don't recommend that kind of attitude when it comes to having children.

Actually Dave, I listened to both movements in their entirety while I was on a long drive and I favor the second movement as well (don't take this the wrong way Paul but I respectfully disagree).  The taking it in bit by bit has more to do with my "multiverse" comment.  In other words, the listener would need to listen several times to enjoy all of the layers the piece has to offer.  

Jasen, LOL re. your third movement/children comment!  I'm fine with just one actually, (child, not movement).

As for listening to the whole thing, gotcha.  I wasn't too sharp to pick up the meaning of your words, probably because spending the entire day chasing around a one year old, makes the ol' noodle non-functional.

Take care,

Dave

www.dearvillainmusic.com - music for live performance by David Carovillano

www.acclarion.ca - concert accordion & clarinet duo
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