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Reverb choices in Synchron Player / need more description
Last post Sun, Oct 17 2021 by Macker, 7 replies.
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Posted on Wed, Jul 22 2020 17:14
by cmillar
Joined on Thu, Dec 12 2013, Maryland US, Posts 10

Hello, I'm a new user to the Synchron Player and VSL (love it all)

I'm needing some further explanation and descriptions of the Reverb choices in the Sychron Player Mixer.

In the mixer channels, I see the 'Main' output and also the 'Effect' output channel.

Is the 'Reverb' in the effect channel the actual Synchron Stage IR impulse reverb?

And, regarding the 'Algorytmic Reverb' at the bottom of the far-right mixer 'Preset' column. What exactly is this reverb unit and where is it coming from?

Are the microphone setup 'Presets' (at the top of this column) tied in with this 'algorytmic Reverb'? Do the mic presets depend on this reverb for anything? Or, is is just a 'sweetener' to use when desired as described?

What is the best way to ensure that all my instrument choices are actually all playing in the same room and soundstage?

I hear the differences in all the Reverbs, but would love to have some further explanations of possible setups with the Reverbs and Mic preset choices.

Thanks all!

Posted on Sun, Jul 26 2020 09:46
by Andreas8420
Joined on Mon, Dec 02 2019, Vienna, Posts 64

Hello Cam,

I replied to your email case - but I'll post the answer here so that others can find it too:

> Is this Reverb tied in with the ‘IR’ reverb somehow? Is it an entirely different reverb? [This question relates to SYNCHRON-ized libraries]

1) The Reverb FX Plugin & the IR are two different reverbs, placed on top of each other. Feel free to bypass one or the other or both to hear the differences they make. I added a screenshot.

> What exactly is the ‘Algorytmic’ Reverb?

2) The "Algorithmic Reverb" is just an additional way to add artificial reverb to your output. It's deactivated by default on all instrument presets as they have their own "Room Reverb" FX plugin in a dedicated reverb channel we created.

> What is the best way to start with the pure, actual Synchron Stage settings that VSL has so carefully created?

3) By loading one of the ready-to-use presets and start playing. :-) All VSL instruments (SYNCHRON-ized & Synchron libraries) are already seated and balanced correctly to each other.

Best regards & don't forget to enjoy your Sunday! Best, Andreas

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Posted on Tue, Jul 28 2020 15:59
by cmillar
Joined on Thu, Dec 12 2013, Maryland US, Posts 10

Thanks so much for the explanations.

It's a great interface! Makes for quick work and decisions.

Posted on Sat, Oct 16 2021 19:50
by Sekrit_Studios
Joined on Mon, Nov 30 2020, Posts 5

OMG, thank you so much for asking this...

I wish that this were in the FAQ or something.  I've been laboring over whether to begin with silent stage or synchron stage for weeks because I do NOT want to be locked into any sound stage.  And when I finally came to understand what "Silent Stage" was, which is the most brilliant concept ever, I came to find out that Synchron supercedes, it and that all surround technologies will ignore silent stage.  I feel like i'm taking crazy pills.

 

Like who opts OUT of creative control to place their "Players" where they want (especially when no other company seems to be doing it).  I'm a bit heartbroken.  

Posted on Sat, Oct 16 2021 20:28
by PaoloT
Joined on Tue, Dec 27 2016, Posts 1189

Originally Posted by: Sekrit_Studios Go to Quoted Post

all surround technologies will ignore silent stage

I would expect that the forthcoming MIR 3D will apply surround to the Silent Stage libraries.

Paolo

Posted on Sun, Oct 17 2021 04:50
by Seventh Sam
Joined on Sat, Dec 29 2018, Posts 323

Originally Posted by: Sekrit_Studios Go to Quoted Post

OMG, thank you so much for asking this...

I wish that this were in the FAQ or something.  I've been laboring over whether to begin with silent stage or synchron stage for weeks because I do NOT want to be locked into any sound stage.  And when I finally came to understand what "Silent Stage" was, which is the most brilliant concept ever, I came to find out that Synchron supercedes, it and that all surround technologies will ignore silent stage.  I feel like i'm taking crazy pills.

 

Like who opts OUT of creative control to place their "Players" where they want (especially when no other company seems to be doing it).  I'm a bit heartbroken.  

It's worth noting that with Synchron-IZED libraries, you can disable the IR and reverb and use essentially use them just as you would the silent stage libraries.  They are, in fact, the same samples, just pre-configured to "sit" with full Synchron products.

*Synchron* products, on the other hand, have the room information inherent in the samples.

Posted on Sun, Oct 17 2021 10:52
by Macker
Joined on Tue, Aug 21 2018, London, Posts 379

I'd like to add a few more observations.

  1.   Mix Presets. For a moment let's put ourselves in VSL's position - or indeed in the position of pretty much any and every maker of virtual instruments.

If you want your product to have an immediate positive impact on new and prospective customers, you'll want to provide presets that have instant appeal; served up on a plate with no effort required by the customer. And it's long been an industry cliché that your up-front presets will need some beautiful reverb to ensure they have that immediate, irresistible and inspirational je ne sais quoi

Moreover, the vast majority of prospective customers don't (yet) have the knowledge, experience, technical expertise, craft and skill-sets required to prepare their own fx, reverbs and configurations that can surpass the attractiveness of the maker's presets. So it's really no surprise to find that many if not most virtual instrument makers design their products with the majority very much in mind.

But potentially there's a serious downside to this marketing strategy. As Jordan Peterson said, "you don't get people to stand up on their own two feet and to adopt responsibility, if everything is given to them". Therefore, as the instrument maker, you must choose to what extent you want to perpetuate the myth that by buying and operating your ready-for-use products, your customers can automatically become succcessful music-makers; and, conversely, to what extent you develop your products and your relationship with your customers such that both you and they willingly engage in the long, intricate process of exploring, learning and improving design and use of your products.

In my opinion, VSL have struck an optimal balance in the very demanding ordeal of riding these two horses. Some customers may find the complexity of VSL's products to be puzzling or even annoying, whilst others may complain that not enough latitude or leeway is designed into their products for users' solutions. There is no way of pleasing the whole market in this particular field of endeavour.

  2.  Surround sound is not, I would submit, about to transform digitally-aided music-making into a new and higher stratum of artistic virtue. Recent history shows how few rock and pop bands made use of more than stereo for concerts and recordings (Pink Floyd being the most notable example). And in films, I recall seeing the first Star Wars in a central London cinema fitted out temporarily with very large surround sound speaker stacks, but can't bring to mind any other examples. I still recall Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon concerts in London's Earl's Court Arena, München Olympic Stadium, and Wiener Staatsoper; mostly the surround sound was about special effects. Those were exciting, thrilling and lovely experiences for audiences, but I think very largely due to the novelty value of surround sound. I'm betting it won't become more commonplace - especially not for orchestral music.

There have long been ways of configuring Silent-Stage libraries to produce surround sound. But the fact remains: it didn't become a thing.

  3.   Silent Stage vs Synchron Stage A. I see no cause to lament VSL's change from recording samples in Silent Stage to Synchron Stage A. For one thing, as noted by VSL, musicians tend to enjoy the sound of their playing in Synchron Stage A. Having worked on a contract involving me in use of an anechoic chamber, I don't imagine that musicians found the experience of sample-recording in the Silent Stage to be particularly helpful, gratifying or even pleasant. I'm all for making things as pleasant and as natural as possible for the musicians who render the samples we use.

The highly professional recording techniques used in Synchron Stage A of course include use of close mics to provide as dry a sound as possible wherever required. The residual acoustic ambience of these close mics can hardly be regarded as any kind of impediment for the vast majority of use cases.

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